Originally from Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré, Alphonse Raymond arrives in Montreal in 1902. The son of a merchant, he first becomes a grocer. In 1905 he acquires a small canning factory on Plessis Street, not far from De la Gauchetière Street, and makes a name for himself in the production of jams and marinades. His company expands quickly and in 1913 he constructs a new factory on Panet Street just south of Ontario Street. Raymond products—including the famous strawberry jam—are savored by Quebecois families until the 1970s.  

 

Face of the extension on Panet Street, built in the 1950s 
Françoise de la Harpe et Céline Champagne photography,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

In 1920, Alphonse Raymond adds a fourth floor to his factory on Panet Street. The site undergoes multiple phases of expansion to keep up with the company’s growth. Over the course of its development in the 1950s, the complex consists of two sets of buildings on Panet Street and Lalonde Avenue.

 

Book of handwritter notes that belonged to Eugène Raymond, circa 1914 
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

In the early days of the company, information about production costs, sources of strawberries, or recipes for different products were often recorded in handwritten manuscripts.

 

Original document of the recipe for Raymond mayonnaise, 1930
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

Recipes for different Raymond products often consisted of few ingredients and were recorded in handwritten form.

 

Glass jar for Raymond mayonnaise, unknown date 
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

In addition to jams and marinades, Alphonse Raymond also produced various condiments like mayonnaise.

 

An add aimed at women that praises the quality of various Raymond jams 
La Revue Moderne, June 1921,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

In the 1920s, Alphonse Raymond products are aimed at middle class households, such as readers of La Revue moderne.

 

Metal container for Marquette jam, unknown date 
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

The Raymond brand is always reserved for the highest quality products. But other brands such as Nationale, Marquette, and Red Star are produced at lower cost and sold for a better price.

 

Glass jar and metal cover, unknown date 
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

“Made to Please!” was the company’s advertising slogan.

 

Enbossed glass bottle for table syrup, unknown date 
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

The Raymond company also made table syrup, the ingredients of which we do not know. This product was sold in embossed glass bottles.

 

Raymond company pencil, unknown date 
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

The distribution of promotional objects was also a commercial strategy used by Raymond.

 

Various products made by the company, circa 1970
Raymond collection,
Écomusée du fier monde

 

The company was sold in the early 1970s and the Raymond brand disappeared a few years later. Nonetheless, many people still recall various products that marked their memories.