Milk in Montréal

 

In 1925, the City of Montréal adopts a regulation that requires the pasteurization of milk sold on its territory, with the exception of certified raw milk. Put into effect in 1926, this new requirement favoured the emergence of numerous small milk businesses and their pasteurization factories. Present in many neighbourhoods, the vast majority of these businesses have now disappeared, but not without leaving certain traces, especially in the memories of countless Montrealers.

 

<b>The front of the Canadienne Dairy, Gaspe street, in 1938.</b> Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
The front of the Canadienne Dairy, Gaspe street, in 1938.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

 

The Canadienne Dairy is a cooperative of milkmen who put their resources together to set up a factory, following the adoption of the pasteurization regulation.

 

<b>Products of the Canadienne Dairy in 1938.</b> Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
Products of the Canadienne Dairy in 1938.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

 

Businesses offer numerous dairy products to their Montréal consumers. Glass is the container of choice for milk and cream.

 

<b>Bottling at the Canadienne Dairy in 1938.</b> Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
Bottling at the Canadienne Dairy in 1938.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

 

Pasteurization and bottling are part of a process that’s highly mechanized as of the 1930’s.

 

<b>Promotional brochure for the 25th anniversary of the Ferme St-Laurent, 1952.</b> Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
Promotional brochure for the 25th anniversary of the Ferme St-Laurent, 1952.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

 

The Ferme St-Laurent is a dairy cooperative founded in 1927. In the year of its 25th anniversary, it is the enterprise that pasteurizes the greatest volume of milk in Canada.

 

<b>In memory of the 25th anniversary of La Ferme St-Laurent Ltée., October 8th 1952.</b> Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
In memory of the 25th anniversary of La Ferme St-Laurent Ltée., October 8th 1952.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

Members of the cooperative underscore the 25th anniversary of La Ferme St-Laurent during a large banquet.

 

<b>Glass milk bottles: a quart, a pint and a half pint , date unknown.</b> Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
Glass milk bottles: a quart, a pint and a half pint , date unknown.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

 

Jacques Janvier Joubert is the first to use glass bottles to market his milk in 1892. The use of this container becomes increasingly more standard. Three formats are used above all: the quart, the pint and the half pint.

 

<b>Twelve-bottle wooden case, date unknown.</b> Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
Twelve-bottle wooden case, date unknown.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

 

For the transport of milk, twelve-bottle wooden and metal cases were used.

 

Eight-bottle metal basket, circa 1950. Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde
Eight-bottle metal basket, circa 1950.
Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde

 

The milkman often uses a metal basket between his delivery truck and the doors of his clients.

 

 

Representing a third generation of milkmen, Mr. Frank Foti is a member of La Ferme St-Laurent between the end of the 1950’s and the disappearance of the company in 1987.

The account of Mr. Frank Foti, 2010.
Lucie Lambert, Montréal dairy heritage collection, Écomusée du fier monde